Resume Power Words and Why You Should be Using Them

So you think your potential employer might be interested in a dedicated, experienced, hard-working team player, with strong communication skills? Think again. Using, or over-using these tired resume clichés might just get you a one-way ticket to the reject heap.

Instead, when drafting your sophisticated, attention-grabbing resume, think strategically, and use powerful keywords and action words to not only stand out from the competition, but improve your ranking on automated applicant tracking systems.

Use relevant keywords that match your skills with your employer’s job description

Study your employer’s written job description and any other collateral information published in regard to the position you are applying for. If the recruiter is using a tracking system to match candidates to the specific role, you can be sure the keywords they are searching for will be found here.

Look at company websites, annual reports and marketing materials to understand the language of your prospective employer; adapt your resume to suit

Using the same language as your prospective employer should help make your resume read like a potential match, but doing your research may also help improve your credibility as an organised and inspiring candidate.

Use powerful nouns to outline your experience and your qualifications

The most powerful words on your resume are often nouns. Software used to qualify potential candidates is often searching for specific qualifications, certifications, titles, hardware or software names, names of specific products or technology, trade names or names of associations or organisations. Be specific and thorough.

When using verbs, be descriptive and precise. Choose verbs that exemplify your strengths and creativity.

Powerful

Led
Transformed
Resolved
Reduced
Proved
Progressed
Increased
Succeeded
Solved
Exceeded
Discovered
Achieved

Weak

Supported
Assisted
Demonstrated
Applied
Showed
Worked
Utilised
Sorted
Facilitated
Served
Provided
Contributed

Avoid using too many superlatives or cringe worthy adjectives

If you can effectively use your nouns and verbs, using superlatives (best, greatest, highest, largest) and adjectives (superb, dynamic, very, cooperative) becomes not only redundant, but could even make your resume appear flimsy and contrived.

There is plenty of online resources available to help you bulk up your vocabulary, and help you choose words with power and influence.

 

© Advocate Resumes Australia & New Zealand.

Guest Blog Author: Nicole Daws.
Advocate Resumes Guest Post.


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